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Resume Advice

PUTTING TOGETHER A SOLID RESUME
Putting together a good resume can be a daunting task for many people – so where do you start? Most importantly be clear and concise. Recruiters spend a lot of time writing up notes after screening a candidate. This information is included with the submission of the candidate’s resume to the client but 80% of the time, the client does not read our detailed notes. The employer goes straight to reading the resume and then makes a snap judgment as to whether they want to meet the candidate. So it is essential that you keep your resume somewhat short and results oriented. Employers often receive hundreds of applications for a single job, but only a few will be shortlisted. A good resume helps you stand out from the crowd.

Do

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Be accurate, concise and precise

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As a good rule of thumb, submit a one page resume for each five years of experience and add a page for each additional 5 years period

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Give details but don’t overwhelm the reader. Examples of good details to include: what does your company sell; how big is your company; how many people have you managed; what customers do you market to; personal results

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Stick to the facts and be honest • Explain gaps in the timeline of your resume

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Tailor your resume to fit the job you’re applying for

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Review each line in your resume. Ask yourself the question, ‘Is this statement fluff or does it demonstrate how you have saved your company money, driven revenue or saved your company time’. If your bullet point sounds like a job description bullet point, take it out!

-7-
Use action words to describe your experience – conducted, designed, established, expanded, managed, planned, streamlined

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Include quantitative achievements – successfully led project x to completion on time and 20% under budget – 145% quota achievement; Won President’s Club etc • Make sure that the font is easy to read

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Results, results, results!!!

Don't

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Have a 4-10 page resume (no one wants to read a book)

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Include bizarre, overconfident, or eccentric objectives.

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Include strange hobbies

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Include unnecessary information such as company addresses and phone numbers or personal information such as your social security number.

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Include a photograph or physical characteristics.

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Include references (this can wait until you are further down the process)

-7-
Include your salary – past, present or expected.

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Include private matters (sexual orientation, religious or political affiliations, marital status, age, etc.).

-9-
Include unprofessional contact information (partier@aol.com)

HOW TO ORGANIZE YOUR RESUME

Contact Information:

Provide your full name, complete address, home and mobile phone numbers with area codes, plus email.

Education:
List universities and colleges attended, degrees, diplomas, certificates earned, and any other courses taken since graduation along with any academic awards received. Mention your grades only if they were above average.

Work Experience:
Describe your work history in detail, in reverse chronological order. For each of your employers, state your job title, your responsibilities and your accomplishments.

Professional Affiliations:
Indicate any associations you belong to which are relevant to your profession, along with any leadership positions you have held.

Activities and Interests:
List your volunteer activities and achievements in community groups plus hobbies and other personal interests. Note special skills you possess and positions you have held.

References:
Unless you are specifically requested to provide references, state that your references are available upon request.

 

Do you need a cover letter?

1). Survey finds that 90% of the 2,000 hiring managers in the survey ignored cover letters: http://management.fortune.cnn.com/2012/06/08/are-cover-letters-necessary

2). Make sure you have an EXCELLENT resume and a well completed Linkedin profile. Don’t worry about spending a lot of time on the cover letter (unless asked specifically by the employer)